Take A Free Personality Test And Learn Important Career Implications

myers-briggs-personality-testIt’s always fascinating to learn more about ourselves and gain a deeper understanding of  why we behave in particular ways, like specific things and dislike others. It is also interesting to know more about other people’s behaviour.

One tool which can provide such insights is a Personality Test.

The concept of Personality Type was first developed in 1921, by the Swiss psychologist Carl Jung. Then in the 1940s, Katherine Briggs and her daughter Isabel Myers, refined Jung’s concept of personality and started developing the Myers Briggs Personality Test, which is one of the popular personality assessments available today. Their intention was to create an instrument, which would make the concept of personality type easier for people to understand and use in practical ways.

How can we define personality, based on the work done by Carl Jung and the Myers Briggs Personality Typology?

To understand your personality you need to know more about the following:

  1. Where you prefer to focus your attention
  2. How you prefer to digest information and what kind of information you notice naturally
  3. How you like to make decisions
  4. Whether you like to live in a more structured way or a more spontaneous way (or how you prefer to deal with the outer world)

There are two opposite preferences for each of these four points. In other words, there are two opposite ways in which you could perform each point. These preferences are explained in the table below.

You use all of these eight preferences at different points in time. For example, sometimes you might go about your day in a very structured/organised way and at other times you might take a more spontaneous approach.

However, you will use one preference in each row more often than the other and feel more comfortable using that preference. Think of it as writing with your dominant hand, which feels natural. When you use your dominant hand for writing, you are very comfortable and write without any effort. When you use the other hand, you can still write but have to put in a much greater effort to produce anything legible.

If you think about it, we go about our day doing two things 1) Taking in information 2) Making decisions based on that information. This is exactly, what the preferences in the middle (S-N, T-F) are concerned with. These two preferences form the core of your personality. The other two preferences (E-I, J-P) mostly indicate how we use the core preferences.

Your preference on each row of the table above indicates your personality type. So if you prefer Extraversion (E), Intuition (N), Feeling (F) and Perceiving (P); then your personality type is ENFP. As you probably realised, there are 16 personality types, which are shown below.

ISTJ ISFJ INFJ INTJ
ISTP ISFP INFP INTP
ESTP ESFP ENFP ENTP
ESTJ ESFJ ENFJ ENTJ

Complete the free personality test below, to learn more about your personality type. For some questions, you might find it hard to make a selection because you relate to both options. In such cases, think about which option you prefer more, which describes you best and which applies to you more often.

Once you complete all the questions the page will refresh. Scroll back to this point, in order to see your results, which will be in the form of 4 letters.

 


 

How would you describe yourself when interacting with other people?



What is your preference for taking action?



How would you describe your social circle?



When you are working or concentrating on something, do you..



How comfortable are you with making conversation and small talk?



What energises and recharges you more?



Do you prefer noisy/active environments or more quiet settings?



Do you like having...



Do you enjoy being in the spotlight?



Which describes you better?



Is your best work...



How do you process and clarify your thoughts?



Do you prefer?



On a typical day in the office, do you like working on..



Are you more...



Are you present or future oriented?



What type of information do you prefer?



How do you solve problems?



Do you tend to...



Do you like and focus on...



What type of information do you notice and prefer?



How do you prefer to make decisions?



Do you tend to...



How do you typically react when approached with a new idea?



When it comes to other people's feelings are you...



When making hard/tough decisions...



Do you believe...



Are you more...



When listening to what people are saying do you...



How do you like to approach your daily life?



Do you...



How do you like to work?



What do you think of to-do lists and check-boxes?



When making a decision do you...



How you do pursue your goals?



Is your room and work space typically...





 


 

After you complete the exercise and know your personality type, have a look at the relevant description below, to see what it means for your career and job search.


ISTJ


ISTJs are most likely to find interesting and satisfying those careers that make use of their depth of concentration, their reliance on facts, their use of logic and analysis, and their ability to organize. ISTJs are very often found in management careers, particularly in areas of government, public service, and private business, and they are often found in technical and production-oriented careers as well. Their task orientation, realistic grounding, dependability and respect for the facts often draw them to careers that call for an organized approach to data, people, or things. These same qualities can also lead to their effectiveness as managers.

For ISTJs the job search tends to be a very thoughtful and practical process. They are excellent gatherers of job-related information, and they can be very organized and thorough in preparing application materials or in marketing themselves. Their dependability and willingness to take on responsibility will usually be communicated to others during the job search. Potential drawbacks for ISTJs in the job search may include a tendency to narrow the search too much, failure to consider unusual opportunities or job options, and a tendency to be cautious and undersell themselves. Under stress, ISTJs may become pessimistic during this process, and they may also become uncharacteristically impulsive. They may find it useful to engage their ability to be objective, and to see the importance of developing some flexibility in their interactions with others. They may also benefit from developing a healthy amount of enthusiasm and assertiveness as they engage in the job search.

Examples of careers often chosen by ISTJs include management in business or government, accounting, engineering, computer operations and analysis, technical/trade, teaching, police/corrections work, and skilled trade and crafts work.

ISTJs are found much less often in careers that are characterized by a great deal of nurturing work and/or relationship-oriented work. In addition, they are found less often in careers that require ongoing attention to more theoretical, abstract and symbolic material. They are also found much less often in careers in the arts and careers that require a significant amount of spontaneous adaptation or expressiveness in a group context.


ISFJ


ISFJs are most likely to find interesting and satisfying those careers that make use of their depth of concentration, their reliance on facts, their warmth and sympathy (i.e., their emphasis on interpersonal values), and their ability to organize. ISFJs are very often found in careers that involve nurturing or healing others and also in some spiritually oriented careers. Their sense of duty, personal commitment and practicality often draw them to careers in which they can support and be of service to others. These same qualities can also lead to their effectiveness in the helping and health-oriented careers.

For ISFJs the job search tends to be a very thoughtful and practical process. They are excellent gatherers of job-related information, and can be very thorough and organized in their job search, job application, or in marketing themselves. Their perseverance, stability and warmth are usually communicated to others during the job search. Potential drawbacks for ISFJs in the job search may include a tendency to overlook unusual job possibilities or options, a tendency to undersell themselves, and sensitivity to rejection. Under stress, ISFJs may feel some pessimism during this process, and they may become uncharacteristically impulsive. They can benefit from discussing their concerns with a trusted friend, and from seeing the importance of developing a larger perspective on their situation. They may also benefit from cultivating a healthy amount of assertiveness and optimism as they go about the job search.

Examples of careers often chosen by ISFJs include teaching (particularly K-12), medical fields with high patient contact (including family medicine and nursing), religious work, library careers, office and clerical work, and personal and social service work.

ISFJs are found much less often in careers that are characterized by a great deal of analytically-oriented technical work or work that requires ongoing attention to more theoretical, abstract, and symbolic information. They are also found much less often in careers that require continual adaptation and frequent change, and careers that require a more distant or analytical approach to people.


INFJ


INFJs are most likely to find interesting and satisfying those careers that make use of their depth of concentration, their grasp of possibilities, their warmth and sympathy (i.e., their emphasis on interpersonal values), and their ability to organize. INFJs are very often found in careers where creativity and tending to human development are primary activities. Their orientation to people, their confidence in their insights into the nature of things and people, and their fertile imagination often attract them to careers where they can draw out the possibilities in others. These same qualities can also lead to exceptional empathic abilities, which may seem to border on the psychic.

For INFJs the job search can be an opportunity to use their creativity as well as their organizational and rapport-building skills. They can envision job possibilities easily, and can pursue them both through their ability to connect with others and through their potential ability to be task-oriented. Their interpersonal orientation, persuasiveness and insight are usually communicated to others during the job search. Potential drawbacks for INFJs in the job search include unrealistic expectations for a job, inaction, painful feelings that the job search is grueling or cheapening, and inattention to details of jobs or of the job search. Under stress, INFJs may develop a potentially adversarial attitude toward the world of work, and may get caught up in less relevant details. They may find it helpful to maintain a sense of humor as they view events from a broader, more meaningful perspective and as they develop more realistic job expectations and flexibility in dealing with the details of the job search.

Examples of careers often chosen by INFJs include all positions within all denominations of the ministry, education (including religious, foreign language and the arts), architecture, medicine, psychology, media and marketing work, counseling, and fine arts.

INFJs are found much less often in careers that are characterized by a great deal of technical work, attention to detail, work that requires realistic precision or production, or work that requires more business and bureaucratic management abilities. They are also found much less often in careers that require more practical hands-on or mechanical work, or careers that may involve a significant amount of interpersonal conflict.


INTJ


INTJs are most likely to find interesting and satisfying those careers that make use of their depth of concentration, their grasp of possibilities, their use of logic and analysis, and their ability to organize. INTJs are very often found in academic, scientific, theoretical, and technical positions that require prolonged periods of solitary concentration and tough-minded analysis. Their task orientation, powers of abstraction, perseverance, and willingness to look at situations or systems in creative ways often draw them to careers where they pursue the implementation of their inner vision. Their trust in their own insights, their faith that they see into the true meaning behind events, and their willingness to bring their insights into practical real-world application often communicate to others an impression of confidence, competence and drive. Though these qualities often lead to their being placed in executive and management positions, INTJs are intensely individualistic and resist being bound to routine.

For INTJs the job search is an opportunity to use their creativity, their skills in synthesizing information, and their ability to approach the market in an organized and strategic fashion. They can usually envision many career possibilities, and can selectively target and pursue job options with their potential ability to be task-oriented. Their competence, analytical skills and insight are usually communicated to others during the job search. Potential drawbacks for INTJs in the job search include unrealistic expectations for a job, inaction, failure to communicate warmth or diplomacy in interactions with others, and inattention to details of jobs or of the job search. Under stress, INTJs may develop a potentially adversarial attitude toward the world of work, and may get caught up in less relevant details. They may find it helpful to analyze their experience objectively as they see the need to be more realistic in their expectations about jobs and to be more flexible in dealing with the details of the job search.

Examples of careers often chosen by INTJs include law, engineering, architecture, physical and life sciences, psychology and social science, computer science, writing/editing, careers in the arts, and consulting.

Careers in which INTJs are found much less often tend to be characterized by a great deal of nurturing work, relationship-oriented work, or work that requires practical, routinized production or delivery of services. They are also found much less in careers that depend predominantly on hands-on work, attention to detail, and/or adherence to structures imposed by others.


ISTP


ISTPs are most likely to find interesting and satisfying those careers that make use of their depth of concentration, their reliance on facts, their use of logic and analysis, and their adaptability. ISTPs are found in a variety of careers, but are most often found in careers that require tough-minded analytical and realistic approaches. Many of these careers are related to building and production, while others involve providing direct delivery of technically oriented services. Their quiet adaptability, realistic grounding, and their willingness to critically analyze the facts often draw them to careers where they can take a pragmatic approach to problem solving. They may also manifest a great curiosity about things, not so much in an abstract search for their meaning, but a curiosity about how and why they work and about their application.

For ISTPs the job search is an opportunity to apply their analytical skills to the facts of the job search. They can pragmatically gather information on prospective jobs, and critically look at what they need to do to apply for a job or to market themselves. Their ability to adapt to the needs of the moment, take risks, and think realistically about problems are usually communicated to others during the job search. Potential drawbacks for ISTPs during the job search include a tendency to focus on the immediate present rather than on long-term job plans, difficulty in following through with job search tasks, and putting off making job decisions out of fear that something more exciting may come along. Under stress, ISTPs can feel overwhelmed as they engage in this process, and can benefit from checking the facts and realities of their situation. They can also benefit from considering what is truly of value to them, which will give them the drive to persevere and follow through on all parts of the job search.

Examples of careers often chosen by ISTPs include military or corrections work, farming, skilled trade and crafts work, mechanics, electrical/electronic engineering or technical work, computer programming, law, and accounting.

ISTPs are found much less often in careers that require a great deal of nurturing work, relationship-oriented work and/or work that requires attention to more highly theoretical, abstract and symbolic material. They also tend to be found much less often in careers in the field of religion (whether ministry or education), and careers in the expressive arts.


ISFP


ISFPs are most likely to find interesting and satisfying those careers that make use of their depth of concentration, their reliance on facts, their warmth and sympathy (i.e., their emphasis on interpersonal values), and their adaptability. ISFPs are very often found in careers that allow for direct practical care of people or hands-on detail work that may require much solitude. Their realistic grounding, depth of feeling, and very personal approach to life often draw them to careers where they can help others in very pragmatic ways. Though often hidden, their warm and sympathetic nature can be felt by others who know them, and they communicate kindness in ways that make them exceptional candidates for working with people in need, children or animals. Their idealism and deep feeling make them particularly sensitive to the suffering of others.

For ISFPs the job search tends to be a practical and people-oriented process. They are excellent gatherers of information, and their personal orientation can open doors for gathering information from people they know and trust. Their pragmatic people orientation, hands-on abilities, and adaptability will usually be communicated to others during the job search. Potential drawbacks for ISFPs in the job search include a tendency to overlook unusual job opportunities or options, an unwillingness to look at the long-term consequences of a job decision, and a tendency to under evaluate their very real accomplishments. Under stress, ISFPs can become quite critical of others and feel incompetent as they engage in this process. If they notice this trend, they can benefit from attending to the more empowering facts of the situation, which may include truly acknowledging their skills and the importance of communicating them to others. They may also benefit from moderating their idealism and expectations about jobs and the job search.

Examples of careers often chosen by ISFPs include health care and service work, nursing, office or clerical work, personal service careers, skilled craft, trade and technical careers (carpenter, surveyor, radiological technician, etc.), police/detective careers, and teaching (particularly K-12).

ISFPs are found much less often in careers that are highly structured and in abstract fields such as management, engineering, and law. In addition, they are found less often in careers that require a great deal of tough-minded analysis of symbolic and technical material and where skills of logical analysis are constantly called for. They are also less commonly found in careers in the physical or life sciences, careers in the performing or fine arts, and careers in business or accounting.


INFP


INFPs are most likely to find interesting and satisfying those careers that make use of their depth of concentration, their grasp of possibilities, their warmth and sympathy (i.e., their emphasis on interpersonal values), and their adaptability. INFPs are very often found in careers where there are opportunities to help others. Their very personal approach to life, their sensitivity to people, and their willingness to look beyond what is present and obvious often draw them to careers in which they can foster growth and development in others. These qualities can also lead to an ability to quickly establish rapport with others, and the development of excellent communication skills.

For INFPs the job search can be an opportunity to use their creativity, flexibility and their skills in self-expression. They can generate a variety of job possibilities, consider them for their ability to fulfill their values, and pursue them using their skills in communicating with others, either in writing or in person. Their idealism, commitment, flexibility and people skills will usually be communicated to others in the job search. Potential drawbacks for INFPs in the job search include unrealistic expectations for a job, feelings of inadequacy or lack of confidence, and inattention to details of the jobs or of the job search. Under stress, INFPs may become quite critical of others and themselves, and they may hold themselves back because they feel incompetent as they engage in this process. They can benefit from allowing their intuition to give them a new perspective on the possibilities available in the situation. They may also find it helpful to truly acknowledge their skills, as well as the importance of communicating those skills to others. In addition, INFPs can benefit from developing realistic expectations about the job search, and from objectively looking at the logical consequences of the various decisions they make.

Examples of careers often chosen by INFPs include fine arts careers, writing and journalism, psychology and psychiatry, social sciences, counseling, architecture, education (religion, art, drama, music, and foreign languages), library careers, acting, and entertainment.

INFPs are found much less often in careers that require skills and interests in management, business, factory work, and other fields requiring attention to detail, systematic logical analysis, or highly structured work. They are also found much less often in careers that require a great deal of interpersonal competition, or careers that involve a significant amount of hands-on, manual, or mechanical work.


INTP


INTPs are most likely to find interesting and satisfying those careers that make use of their depth of concentration, their grasp of possibilities, their use of logic and analysis, and their adaptability. INTPs are very often found in academic, theoretical, and technical positions, many of which require prolonged periods of solitary concentration and tough-minded analysis. Their concern with ideas and their natural curiosity about the underlying principles and explanations for events often draws them to careers where an in-depth understanding of some abstract subject is required. Their abilities to become absorbed in an idea, to concentrate to the exclusion of all distractions, and to be objectively critical and creative often lead to their gaining a remarkable understanding of some complex problem, issue, or subject matter.

For INTPs the job search is an opportunity to use their analytical skills, their creativity and their adaptability. They can conceive of a variety of job opportunities, see the long-term consequences of decisions, and be innovative both in their job search and in their selling of themselves. Their critical thinking skills, ingenuity, and flexibility will usually be communicated to others in the job search. Potential drawbacks for INTPs in the job search include unrealistic expectations for a job or the job search, inaction, failure to establish rapport with others or to attend to the interpersonal requirements of the job search, and reluctance to make a decision. Under stress, INTPs can feel overwhelmed as they engage in this process, and can benefit from allowing their insight to provide them with a new idea or a new perspective on the situation. They may also find it useful to determine what is important to them, and to be sure to act and follow through on the important details of the job search. They can also benefit from considering what is truly of value to them, which will give them the drive to persevere and follow through on all parts of the job search.

Examples of careers often chosen by INTPs include physical and life sciences, computer science, social sciences, architecture, law, careers in the arts and entertainment, photography, writing and journalism, engineering, and medicine.

Careers in which INTPs are found much less often tend to be highly structured and detail oriented, or require living in a highly routinized environment, such as in military or corrections work. INTPs are also found much less often in careers that involve a great deal of direct human service work or careers that require ongoing attention to people’s emotional lives or daily needs, including for example the religious professions, nursing, or teaching young people.


ESTP


ESTPs are most likely to find interesting and satisfying those careers that make use of their breadth of interests, their reliance on facts, their use of logic and analysis, and their adaptability. ESTPs are found in a variety of careers, but are most often found in careers that require an active, realistic and hands-on approach. Their realistic grounding, adaptability, and desire for contact with the world often draw them to careers in trades, business and sales, and some of the technically oriented professions. They are inclined to put more trust in, and learn better from, firsthand experience, and they have an active curiosity about the world in which they live. Their friendliness, flexibility, and tolerance of the realities of a situation can make them quite skillful in handling interpersonal conflict. These qualities, in conjunction with their use of a more objective and analytic approach to decision making, can make them superbly pragmatic problem-solvers and skilled in convincing or negotiating with others.

For ESTPs the job search is an extremely practical process. They can actively make connections with others and/or make use of past connections to gather information on jobs, they can critically and objectively look at the realities of what will be required in the job search, and they can typically sell themselves well. Their energy, adaptability and practicality are usually communicated to others during the job search. Potential drawbacks for ESTPs in the job search include a tendency to focus only on the immediate present rather than the long-term job plans, failure to consider unusual job opportunities or career paths, and failure to follow through or to communicate seriousness and dependability. Under stress, ESTPs may feel very confused or inappropriately see negative meanings in many events during the job search process. They may find it useful to engage their objectivity to analyze the realities of a situation, and they may benefit from understanding that their options are not really closed off if they develop long-range career plans.

Examples of careers often chosen by ESTPs include marketing and sales, police or corrections work, skilled trades and craft work, construction work, banking, farming, management in small businesses and government, journalism, and personal services.

ESTPs are found much less often in careers that require interests or skills in the theoretical or abstract, such as engineering, architecture, social sciences, or teaching. They also tend to be found much less often in highly structured human care roles such as psychology, health care, and the religious professions.


ESFP


ESFPs are most likely to find interesting and satisfying those careers that make use of their breadth of interests, their reliance on facts, their warmth and sympathy (i.e., their emphasis on interpersonal values), and their adaptability. ESFPs are found in a variety of careers, many of which include active health and human services, such as nursing, teaching and childcare. Their warmth, enthusiasm, attention to detail, and realistic grounding often draw them to these people-oriented careers. ESFPs are also found working in many office and clerical positions as well as in some active outside jobs. They are inclined to put more trust in, and learn better from, first-hand experience, and they have an active curiosity about the world in which they live. ESFPs thoroughly enjoy being with others, and their active curiosity leads them to seek ongoing involvement not only with people, but also in all things physical.

For ESFPs the job search is a pragmatic process and an extension of their very personal style. They can make use of past connections with people or establish new connections easily to gather job information, and they are often excellent at selling themselves and their adaptability. Their pragmatic people orientation and people skills, their flexibility, and their command of the facts are usually communicated to others during the job search. Potential drawbacks for ESFPs in the job search include a tendency to overlook unusual job options, lack of planning and concern with the long view in their job search, and a tendency to put off decision-making. Under stress, ESFPs may feel very confused or inappropriately see negative meanings in many events during the job search process. They may find it useful to engage their feeling to decide what is important to them, and they may benefit from understanding that their options are not really closed off if they develop long-range career plans.

Examples of careers often chosen by ESFPs include teaching (particularly pre-school through grade 12) and coaching, childcare work, clerical and office work, recreational work, food service, nursing, sales, personal services, and religious work/education.

ESFPs are found much less often in careers that are highly structured, theory oriented, or in high technology positions such as engineering, management, and computer sciences. They are also found much less often in careers that tend to require a more impersonal and analytical approach to people, such as social science or law, or that have very little contact with people, such as research or highly quantitative work (e.g., research, accounting, auditing).


ENFP


ENFPs are most likely to find interesting and satisfying those careers that make use of their breadth of interests, their grasp of possibilities, their warmth and sympathy (i.e., their emphasis on interpersonal values), and their adaptability. ENFPs are very often found in careers that are characterized by interests and abilities in working with people and fostering their growth, or that require skills in communication and expression, whether in oral or written form. Their interest in symbols, meaning, and human relationships often attracts them to careers where they can be active, involved with others, and/or pursue new horizons. These same qualities can also lead to their developing particular skills in understanding others and drawing out the possibilities in them. Their imagination and enthusiasm lead them to be innovative in whatever they have chosen as a career, and they are almost driven to think of new projects and new ways of doing things. Their inspirations provide them with the energy to initiate a variety of new activities, and finding solutions to problems energizes them. They do not sit still for long, if ever, due to their active involvement with the world.

For ENFPs the job search can be an opportunity to use their energy, creativity and adaptability. They can imagine a variety of job possibilities, make use of their wide variety of relationships to gather information about job opportunities, and market themselves with confidence. Their ingenuity, enthusiasm, and people skills will usually be communicated to others during the job search. Potential drawbacks for the ENFP in the job search include unrealistic expectations about jobs or the job search, a tendency to let opportunities pass by for lack of decision-making, and failure to be organized or to follow through on important details. Under stress, ENFPs may become withdrawn and listless, or they may become inappropriately concerned with the details of the job search. They may find it helpful to reconsider what their values are and what is important to them as they attend to the realities of the job search, and to appreciate the necessity of taking a measured approach to the job search process.

Examples of careers often chosen by ENFPs include counseling, teaching (particularly at the high school and university level), psychology, journalism/writing, social science, fine arts, acting and entertainment, music, the ministry and religious education, food service, and public relations.

ENFPs are found much less often in careers that require a great deal of precision and logical analysis, or careers that are highly structured or routinized, such as careers in management or in the hard sciences. ENFPs are also found less often in careers that require a great deal of hands-on work or work in isolation.


ENTP


ENTPs are most likely to find interesting and satisfying those careers that make use of their breadth of interests, their grasp of possibilities, their use of logic and analysis, and their adaptability. ENTPs are found in a variety of careers that reflect their diversity of interests, but the fields in which they work typically allow them to engage their inventive and analytical minds. Their creativity, comfort with the abstract, and problem-solving abilities often attract them to careers in the fields of science, communications, and technology. They are almost driven to start new projects or envision new ways of doing things, and because they are so stimulated by complexity and new problems to solve, they are often found in careers where trouble-shooting plays a part. In addition, whatever career they choose must provide them with a stream of new challenges, whether that career is in the sciences, journalism, or elsewhere. ENTPs are not inclined to sit still for long.

For ENTPs the job search can be an opportunity to use their energy, creativity, and flexibility. They can usually imagine a wide range of possibilities, analyze what needs to be done to maximize their chances in the job search, and enthusiastically market themselves. Their enthusiasm, ingenuity, and thoughtful adaptability will usually be communicated to others in the job search. Potential drawbacks for ENTPs in the job search include inattention to the facts and details of jobs or of the job search, inattention to the emotional climate of interviews, and a tendency to allow opportunities to pass by due to lack of decision-making or follow-through activities. Under stress, they may become withdrawn and listless, or they may become inappropriately concerned with the details of the job search. They may find it helpful to objectively analyze the realities of their situation and to understand the necessity of taking a measured approach to the job search process.

Examples of careers often chosen by ENTPs include photography, marketing, public relations, journalism/writing, engineering, computer sciences, life and physical sciences, construction, consulting, acting, arts and entertainment, and law.

ENTPs are found much less often in careers that require a great deal of pragmatic personal care or the fostering of relationships. For example, they are found much less often in careers in childcare, teaching younger students (pre-school through grade 12), nursing, or careers in the field of religion.


ESTJ


ESTJs are most likely to find interesting and satisfying those careers that make use of their breadth of interests, their reliance on facts, their use of logic and analysis, and their ability to organize. ESTJs are often found in careers that require the use of tough-minded, fact-oriented, and goal-directed analysis to provide leadership and direction, and they are often found in high numbers in management and administrative positions. Their energetic orientation to action, along with their objective and realistic decision-making style, often attracts them to these positions, and these same qualities often lead to their developing active and effective organizational and management skills. They are usually comfortable applying their standards of what is correct, efficient, and sensible to all aspects of their environment, and thus they can be very analytical and matter-of-fact in their evaluations not only of situations, but of people as well.

For ESTJs the job search is a very pragmatic process and a natural extension of their approach to the world. Decision-making tends to come naturally to them, and they are efficient and thorough in their gathering of information and in their marketing of themselves. Their ability to network, their stability, and their logical and realistic approach to work will usually be communicated to others during the job search. Potential drawbacks for ESTJs in the job search may include failure to consider unusual opportunities, making decisions too quickly, and a tendency to be unaware of the interpersonal climate of interviews. Under stress, they may feel overwhelmed or become oversensitive to perceived criticisms of their competence as they engage in the job search. They may find it useful to take another look at the facts and realities of their situation, and to consider the importance of staying open to possibilities and to the roles relationships play in the job search process.

Examples of careers often chosen by ESTJs include management careers (in retail, business, restaurant, banking, public service, and government), technical/trade teaching, careers in the military, police and corrections work, social and public services, accounting, and construction.

ESTJs are found much less often in careers that require a great deal of human service work or work requiring emotional care of others, such as careers in the counseling or the religious professions. In addition, they are found less often in work that requires ongoing attention to more theoretical, abstract or symbolic material, or invention-oriented work. They are also found less often in careers in the arts or fine arts, journalism, or careers in the social sciences.


ESFJ


ESFJs are most likely to find interesting and satisfying those careers that make use of their breadth of interests, their reliance on facts, their warmth and sympathy (i.e., their emphasis on interpersonal values), and their ability to organize. ESFJs are very often found in careers that are characterized by a great deal of communication, nurturance and people-oriented work, including teaching and spiritually oriented positions. Their valuing of interpersonal harmony and their desire to find practical ways of working with and helping others often attracts them to these careers, and these same qualities often lead to their developing excellent skills in working with people. Their energy, warmth, and compassion suit them to work in any field in which they have direct contact with others, and they are often skilled in promoting and supporting fellowship and harmony. Their willingness to idealize whatever they find valuable can lead to great loyalty to their organization or the people with whom they work. Tradition and community can have great meaning for them, and thus they will often work dutifully to meet the ends of the setting in which they work.

For ESFJs the job search is a people-oriented pragmatic process. They are able to develop networks and rely on existing relationships to aid in their gathering of information, and they can make use of their organizational skills in preparing for and following through on the search. Their enthusiasm, warmth, and conscientiousness are usually communicated to others during the job search. Potential drawbacks for ESFJs in the job search may include a tendency to make decisions or evaluations of situations too quickly, ignoring objective or long-range considerations in career planning, a tendency to overlook unusual job possibilities or options, and sensitivity to rejection. Under stress, ESFJs may become excessively critical, not only of themselves, but also of others. They may also begin seeing career problems in a black-and-white manner and have unrealistic expectations for advice from experts. They can benefit from attending to all of the facts of their situation, and from appreciating that harmony is not always necessary or possible in the job search.

Examples as careers often chosen by ESFJs include teaching (particularly K-12 and adult education), religious work (all forms of ministry and education), health care (including nursing and health education), personal service work, childcare, household and domestic services, and office and clerical work.

ESFJs are found much less often in careers that are characterized by a great deal of highly abstract, technical and analytical work, as in computer sciences, engineering, and physical sciences. They tend to be found less often in careers where extensive use of theory and logical analysis are required. They are also found much less often in careers where there may be low contact with people, where a more abstract, impersonal or analytical approach to people is involved, or where pragmatic outcomes are not obvious, as in the social sciences, psychology, law, and careers in the arts.


ENFJ


ENFJs are most likely to find interesting and satisfying those careers that make use of their breadth of interests, their grasp of possibilities, their warmth and sympathy (i.e., their emphasis on interpersonal values), and their ability to organize. ENFJs are very often found in careers that require organization, expressiveness, and an interest in people’s emotional, intellectual, and spiritual development. Their orientation to people, their desire for harmony, and their imagination often attract them to these careers, and these same qualities often lead to their developing excellent skills in understanding and working with others. Their energy, warmth, and compassion suit them to work in any field in which they have contact with others, and they are often skilled in promoting fellowship and harmony. They are willing to see the points of view of others, they are tolerant of a variety of opinions, and their enthusiasm often gives them exceptional skills in working with groups. These qualities and skills, in conjunction with their focus on possibilities for people, often draw them to the religious professions, counseling, or teaching.

For ENFJs the job search is a natural extension of their energetic, people-oriented, and organized style. They are able to see a variety of job possibilities, develop a job search plan, and develop and rely on existing networks in gathering information and in marketing themselves. Their enthusiasm, their people and communication skills, and their creativity are usually communicated to others during the job search. Potential drawbacks for ENFJs in the job search may include a tendency to make decisions or evaluations of a situation too quickly, inattention to the details or facts of jobs or of the job search, and a tendency to take rejection personally. Under stress, they may become excessively critical, not only of themselves, but of others. They may also begin seeing career problems in a black-and-white manner and have unrealistic expectations for advice from experts. They can benefit from allowing their intuition to provide a broader, more meaningful perspective on their situation, and from appreciating that harmony is not always necessary or possible in the job search.

Examples of careers often chosen by ENFJs include religious professions (in all denominations and areas of service, including religious education), teaching, counseling and psychology, acting, music, fine arts, writing and journalism, library work, and health care professions (including family practice medicine, nursing, and health education).

ENFJs are found much less often in careers that require interests or skills in business or technical analysis, attention to detail, or hands-on precision trade work, as in engineering or computer operations. They are also found much less often in careers that involve a great deal of interpersonal conflict (as in police or corrections work), administrative work or business management (particularly if that work is not related to a people-oriented profession), or careers that have a low level of contact with people.


ENTJ


ENTJs are most likely to find interesting and satisfying those careers that make use of their breadth of interests, their grasp of possibilities, their use of logic and analysis, and their ability to organize. ENTJs are very often found in careers that require drive, leadership, innovation, and tough-minded analysis; hence, they are often found in management and leadership positions. They are often very aware of power and status issues. Their orientation to decision-making and action, and their determination to make things happen often attract them to these careers, and these same qualities can also lead to their developing skills in managing and systematically achieving goals they have set. They are usually comfortable applying their clear sense of what is correct, efficient, and effective to all aspects of their environment, and thus they can be very analytical and matter-of-fact in their evaluations not only of situations, but of people as well. Their approach to other people tends to be more impersonal, and they value competence in others, even as they value it in themselves.

For ENTJs the job search is an opportunity to use their analytical and planning skills, and their ability to approach the market in an organized and strategic fashion. Decision-making comes naturally to them, and they are able to make use of networks to gather information and to achieve their career search goals. Their drive, problem-solving abilities, competence and willingness to take charge are usually communicated to others during the job search. Potential drawbacks for ENTJs in the job search may include making decisions too quickly and without enough information, a tendency to ignore the interpersonal climate of interviews, failure to communicate diplomacy in interactions with others, and impatience with the details of the job search. Under stress, they may feel overwhelmed or become oversensitive to perceived criticisms of their competence as they engage in the job search, and they may find it useful to consider alternative explanations or to find a larger perspective on their situation. They may also find it useful to consider the importance of patience and of staying open to the roles relationships play in the job search process.

Examples of careers often chosen by ENTJs include a variety of management and administrative positions, business and finance, marketing, psychology and social sciences, law, physical and life sciences, teaching (particularly at the university level), consulting, human resources, acting, and computer sciences.

ENTJs are found much less often in careers that require ongoing attention to the spiritual, emotional or personal needs of others, or that require high levels of pragmatic nurturance, including for example religious professions, nursing, or teaching young people. They are also found much less often in careers that involve providing domestic or personal services, or that require a great deal of detail-oriented clerical work.

Sources & References: The Myers Briggs Manual, The Myers & Briggs Foundation, CAPT

Amit Puri - Managing Consultant, Sandbox Advisors

Amit is an experienced career, business and HR professional. Previously, he has worked with organisations such as Bain & Company, Morgan Stanley and Citigroup. Amit has advanced degrees/qualifications in Career Counselling, Organisational Psychology & HR, Occupational Psychometrics, Career/Life Coaching & Business.

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6 Responses to Take A Free Personality Test And Learn Important Career Implications

  1. ESFJ; was my MBTI type. I was very pleased with the results; they match my personality type very well. I took this test for my Pschology class. Now I must write a summary of what I think of the test.

    • Hi Jean,

      :) I’m happy that you are pleased with the results.

      I think Myers Briggs Personality test is quite an interesting one as well.

      Good luck writing that summary for your Psychology class!

    • Hi Sri,

      What that means is that your preferences for F vs T, and J vs P are not clear.

      In such cases, some more verification/exercises are needed to arrive at your MBTI type. What you can do is to have another look at the descriptions for F vs T, and J vs P again, to see which you prefer. You can also look at detailed descriptions of the possible types to see which you relate to the most – http://www.personalitypage.com/html/high-level.html.

      To make the process easier, you could also consider taking the official MBTI assessment.